Posts Tagged ‘breed spotlight’

Dr. Olsen’s Breed Spotlight: Barbet Dogs

barbetThere are over 340 dog breeds in the world, but only 167 breeds are recognized by the AKC here in the United States. This month for our breed spotlight, I am highlighting a breed that has a storied history. Surprisingly, it has only been recently recognized as a distinct breed by the AKC organization. Let me introduce you to — the Barbet. At one time there used to be around 25 in the whole United States, now there are an estimated 300 Barbets in the country.

Barbet’s (pronounced bar-bay) are a breed that has been traced possibly back to the 14th century for hunting waterfowl in France. One person of royalty who was noted to be fond of them was Henry IV. There is a story in history that one of the king’s mistresses was told off for trying to bring one into a church. It is thought to be related to such breeds as the Poodle, American Water Spaniel, the Otterhound and the Portuguese Water Dog. In fact for many years, the Barbet and the Poodle were referred to as the same dog. It’s main usage was for hunting game and retrieving waterfowl. The breed survived for many years, however it was nearly extinct due to loss of huge numbers during World Wars I and II. Through the efforts of a very devoted few, the old breed is being reborn as a dog of the future.

Barbets have a wooly coat that gives them excellent protection when working. They also have a distinct beard, hence where their name came from, ( “barbe” is french for beard.) They have webbed paws to make them fantastic swimmers and are sometimes referred to as the “mud dog” because it would often get pretty dirty in pursuit of waterfowl.

This medium-sized dog averages between 35 and 60 pounds with heights of 19 to 24 inches at the withers. They have a life span of 12 to 15 years. The Barbets are very intelligent and perform well in confirmation, agility, obedience, rally and retrieval trials. Barbets are calm, friendly and affectionate, so they can be good pets for families as long as their exercise needs are met. They enjoy outdoor activities and are gentle with children, which can make them attached to their families. Sometimes they may suffer from separation anxiety. They are also good with other pets including cats if they are socialized at an early age.

Barbet’s are all shades of black, gray, brown,  and fawn with or without white markings. They have long ears that extend past their jaws. Because they have hair and not fur, they can be considered hypoallergenic making them a good option for people who want a dog but suffer from allergies. Because the hair is so long, they will require some commitment to brushing and combing the long coat daily so that it doesn’t matte, especially if they swim a lot. It is also a breed that will need to be taken to a professional groomer regularly so that the hair can be trimmed from its feet and ears.

Surprisingly, Barbets are a relatively healthy breed, with just a few health issues noted as common in the breed. These include elbow dysplasia, hip dysplasia, eye problems, such as entropion and cataracts, and epilepsy.

In general, the Barbet is a great dog for hunting if you need a soft-mouthed retriever, or as a family companion. It can live in homes for most type of people including young and old. It does need exercise so it will need room to explore. Barbets are friendly, loving and devoted and will want to hang out with you and it prefers that you not be out all the time. It is a brave dog that is quite happy to play around in the mud, so get ready for some fun bath times if this breed for you.

If you have a Barbet or any breed, please do not hesitate to call us at 656-5868. Our team is always ready to answer you questions or assist you in any of your needs with your pets.  

Dr. Olsen’s Breed Spotlight: The Savannah Cat

savannah catEvery once in a while I will spotlight a breed in my newsletters. I have done a couple of dog breeds, but this month I have decided to write one for our furry, feline friends. The breed is called the Savannah Cat. It is a cross between the wild African Serval Cat and a domestic breed—most commonly the Bengals, Egyptian Maus and Oriental Shorthairs. The actual first Savannah was born on April 7, 1986 from parents that were the Serval cat and a Siamese. The kitten’s name was ironically named Savannah. After several years of breeding and creating the new breed standard, the new breed was recognized in 2012 by the International Cat Association.

Most Savannahs have a tall, lean build that gives them the appearance of greater size than their actual weight. This trait has given them the title as being the world’s tallest domestic cat breed in the Guinness Book of World Records since 2006. They are long legged, and if they were athletes, they would be heavily recruited by basketball teams! The Savannah’s can weigh between 8 to 20 pounds and come in many different colors and patterns, such as black, brown, or black spotted tabby; black silver spotted tabby; or black smoke. Most have solid black or dark brown spots on golden, cream, sandy or white backgrounds. They stand out for their bold, solid markings, which can be round, oval, or elongated. Other colors and patterns do exist and can be registered into the breed register but cannot be shown. Savannahs have a triangular head that is supported with a long neck and topped by large, wide ears. They have medium sized eyes that can be any color but are usually blue at birth. This breed takes about 3 years to reach maturity and their back legs are usually a little longer than their front.

The Savannahs are NOT a sweet, quiet lap cat. However they are very active, confident and enjoy reacting with people and other cats. They are intelligent and curious and always looking for something interesting to do—the more adventurous the better. They have a knack for being quite mischievous and are not a good fit for owners that are away a lot or not active. So it may be best to have a companion for them.

This breed is not cheap to own, due to the confirmation of the breed standard, their temperament, demand and scarcity. The F1 Savannah cats which are 50% – 82% or higher wild blood can sell for up to $22,000 because mating is very difficult. They have very small litters and very low fertility. The F1 offspring do not like to be held, but like to be petted, scratched and be in contact with humans. They tend to gravitate to one person and get along with other pets just fine. F1’s are also the largest of the breed, where they can weigh up to 30 pounds. As more domestic blood introduced, the Savannahs will be smaller, but can be more enjoyable members of the family as far as personality goes.

So if you have a Savannah or even a domestic “four legged” furry feline friend, Olsen Veterinary would be happy to make sure that they remain healthy. Please call the office at 618-656-5868 if you have any concerns or would like to schedule an appointment. You can also go to our website and request an appointment. Our team would then be able to set that up.