Posts Tagged ‘accidents inside’

Why Your House-trained Dog Still Poops Inside and What to Do About It

house-trained dog still poops insideWhen your house-trained dog starts having accidents inside of the house, it can be very frustrating. You may be wondering why. Fortunately, this issue can be fairly easy to fix once you determine what is causing it.

Your dog may suddenly start having accidents in the house if their normal outside environment is overstimulating or distracting. Dogs get distracted by new smells, pets, etc. which can cause them to forget that they need to go to the bathroom. To fix this, you should make a routine for your dog to go to the bathroom before they get to play. Avoid talking and interacting with your dog when he is sent outside. If you play with your dog, only do so after he has gone to the bathroom. Sticking to this schedule can eliminate the indoor accidents associated with overstimulation.

Other causes of indoor accidents can include fear and anxiety. If your dog is scared of something in the normal outdoor environment, your dog may not feel comfortable enough to go outdoors. To deal with fear related indoor accidents, you can take your dog outside when it is quiet (e.g. avoiding large trucks driving down the street). If you have recently rescued a fearful dog, it might be best to temporarily train them to use pads inside until they have adjusted to the new environment.

Similarly, changes in schedule can cause indoor accidents. These can include new pets and family members being around the house. Dogs are creatures of habits and changes in their lives can disrupt their schedule. Puppies tend to use the bathroom a few minutes after eating, drinking, playing, or napping while adult dogs tend to go early in the morning, mid-day, early evening, and right before bed. To deal with this issue, keep dogs on a very consistent schedule including feeding times and bathroom times. If you keep this schedule consistent, you will likely see an improvement right away.

A poor diet can also cause indoor accidents. Feeding cheap foods from your supermarket may yield more frequent and bulkier bowel movements. For this reason, a premium dog food is preferable since more nutrients are absorbed and hence less waste is produced. This means smaller stools and on a less-frequent basis. To reduce the amount of waste your dog produces and lessen the number of indoor accidents, feed your dog homemade food (recipes can be found online) or high-quality foods. As a rule of thumb, feed your dog natural or organic brands when possible.

When adopting puppies and if they are over eight and a half weeks old, they have a substrate preference. This means that they have a preference to the surface that they like to go to the bathroom on. If a puppy was trained to use pads instead of grass, it will be a difficult transition for them to start using grass immediately. The dogs may hold it until they find a surface that they like which could be your carpet.

Some possible medical causes to indoor accidents range from kidney issues to dietary problems. If your dog was reliably housetrained in the past and recently began having accidents, it is best to bring your dog to set up an appointment to accurately diagnose and treat your pet.

Simply enough, your dog might be old, or they might be inside for too long. You should not scold your well-trained dog for soiling in the house when they are inside for too long.

Lastly, dogs have a natural instinct to relieve themselves where they have done it before. Your dog can smell their own accident and acknowledge it as an acceptable bathroom area. Deep cleaning can relieve the issues associated with this.

If you ever have any questions, feel free to contact Dr. Olsen at Olsen Veterinary Clinic, available to be reached at 618-656-5868.